Art

Geometric Pattern: Hexagon Ray: Black Outline / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Poppy: Dark / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Science, Wildlife

Cuttlefish go light on lunch when there’s shrimp for dinner

A team of scientists led by the University of Cambridge has found that when cuttlefish know they’re getting shrimp for dinner, they’ll only have a light lunch of crabs. This ability to anticipate their favourite food is an indication of the cephalopod’s complex brain and cognitive abilities — via New Atlas

Science
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Rust offers a cheap way to filter arsenic-poisoned water

When water flows deep underground, it often dissolves inorganic substances from mineral deposits in the earth’s crust. In many regions, these deposits contain arsenic, a naturally occurring element that is colourless, tasteless and odourless. Although its presence is barely noticeable, prolonged exposure to arsenic-contaminated water can lead to gangrene, disease and many types of cancer, resulting in major loss of income for millions of people and even death.

Inspired by natural processes in soil that bind contaminants and filter them out, Case van Genuchten, a researcher in the Geochemistry Department of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, has been using iron oxides such as rust, which are abundant in soil, to filter out arsenic from groundwater. He leads experiments at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that investigate low-cost methods of treating groundwater using only small amounts of electricity and steel or iron. The team’s most recent paper, which compares the arsenic-removing performance of different forms of rust has been published in Water Research — via Phys.org

Art

Geometric Pattern: Poppy: Light / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

World
Getty Images: Mike Hoare, seen here with his bodyguard in 1964, was internationally renowned until his career ended in an embarrassing anti-climax

Obituary: Mike Hoare

Michael Mad Mike Hoare, widely considered the world’s best known mercenary, has died aged 100.

Born in India to Irish parents, he led campaigns in the Congo in the 1960s that earned him fame at the time, and a controversial legacy years later.

His career reached an embarrassing end in 1981, when he was jailed for leading a failed coup in the Seychelles.

Mr Hoare’s son, Chris Hoare, said in a statement that his father died in a care facility in Durban, South Africa.

Mike Hoare lived by the philosophy that you get more out of life by living dangerously, so it is all the more remarkable that he lived more than 100 years, he said — via BBC News

Art

Geometric Pattern: Poppy: Flora / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Poppy: Seasons / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Quarter Circle: Akansha / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Poppy: Brookelyn Zammit / Red Wolf

Custom design for Brookelyn Zammit — by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Art Deco Star: Brookelyn Zammit / Red Wolf

Custom design for Brookelyn Zammit — by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Art Deco Star: Moderna / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Art Deco Star: Classic / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Art Deco Star: Stoneware / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Labyrinth: Dark / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art, Wildlife

Tattoo + Pod / Red Wolf

Tattoo by Eduardo Tavares at Tora Sumi — originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Labyrinth: Light / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Flower Circle: Seasons / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Entertainment

Hair Love / Matthew Cherry

Hair Love, an animated short film from Matthew A Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time — via Youtube

Design

Bridge + Cottage + Skyline / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Flower Circle: Light / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Flower Circle: Dark / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Design

Utility graffiti + Monga Khan on Church / Red Wolf

Poster by artist Peter Drew — originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Flower Circle: Garden / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Pyramid: Seasons / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Craft, Design

Constellation rings / Red Wolf

My take on Joy Complex’s Rainbow Ring. 3D print in silver and bronze via Shapeways — originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Design

Mutt Motorcycles Hilts Green 250 / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Pyramid: Dark / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Craft, History

Antikythera Fragment 08 / Clickspring

Antikythera Fragment #8 – Layout Line Visibility

Wine, wax, woad and yes, There Will Be Blood… all in an effort to discover the best ancient marking fluid. And Clickspring’ll let you decide how the blood supply issue might have been dealt with in the ancient shop – he’s guessing it might not have been much fun being the apprentice on the day the large dial was marked out — via Youtube

Art

Geometric Pattern: Pyramid: Light / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

History, Wildlife

Meet the cat that guards the Hagia Sophia

Gli is a cross-eyed adorable cat that has been living in Hagia Sophia for the past 15 years. The Hagia Sophia is more than 2,000 years old and is one of the most extraordinary structures ever built. It has been a temple, church, mosque and museum through its long history.

See the Hagia Sophia through the eyes of Gli, the cat who guides — via Youtube

Art, Wildlife

Mural + Flowers / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art

Geometric Pattern: Pyramid: Flora / Red Wolf

— by Red Wolf

Science

Scientists have trained rats to drive tiny cars to collect food

Rats have mastered the art of driving a tiny car, suggesting that their brains are more flexible than we thought. The finding could be used to understand how learning new skills relieves stress and how neurological and psychiatric conditions affect mental capabilities.

They constructed a tiny car out of a clear plastic food container on wheels, with an aluminium floor and three copper bars functioning as a steering wheel. When a rat stood on the aluminium floor and gripped the copper bars with their paws, they completed an electrical circuit that propelled the car forward. Touching the left, centre or right bar steered the car in different directions.

Six female and 11 male rats were trained to drive the car in rectangular arenas up to 4 square metres in size. They were rewarded with Froot Loop cereal pieces when they touched the steering bars and drove the car forward — via New Scientist