Design
Sunrising / FCR Original

Sunrising / FCR Original

The talented builders behind FCR Original are Sébastien Guillemot and Mathieu Ménard. From their base in the small town of Chavigny (pop. 7,000), they are making a name for themselves as Triumph specialists of the highest order. They describe the Sunrising Bonneville as A desire to get back to basics: A playful motorcycle without artifice, but still efficient — via Bike EXIF

Design
Kew House / Piercy & Company

Kew House / Piercy & Company

If you fell for the Piercy & Company-designed Kew House in Richmond Upon Thames when it was on Grand Designs, you can now move in. As long as you have plenty of cash to spare. The house was featured back in 2014, with the build/conversion taking around two years in total. It was obviously worth the effort, with Kew House shortlisted for the RIBA house of the year award in 2015. Not bad for a house that initially cost £400,000.

Of course, a lot of value was added in the meantime, with the original property pretty much derelict buildings. A friend of the the owners, renowned architect Stuart Piercy, stepped in and created something very modern, but with the past still in the mix.

The new house is partly set behind the remains of a Victorian stable, with two gabled living wings based around a central courtyard, connected by a glazed circulation block.

If it appeals, you’ll not be surprised to hear that the initial £400,000 investment has increased somewhat with the work. This place is on the market for £3,800,000 — via WowHaus

Design
Timber / WiMoto

Timber / WiMoto

For Dutch builder Wido Veldkamp, bikes that come from his shop WiMotohave to perform as good as they look. This board tracker-cum-cafe racer called Timber is his third ground up build. It started out as a rather vanilla 1979 Suzuki GS550E. Wido’s client picked it up for cheap, and had started chopping it up himself. He soon ran out of skill, and handed the project over — via Bike EXIF

Design
House of Angles / Lester Pritchett

House of Angles / Lester Pritchett

This place dates back to 1967 (perhaps a little later than you might think) and built by the architect, Lester Pritchett, for his own use. Obviously a lover of geometry, the house, also known as the House of Angles, is constructed with 120-degree angles throughout. It sits on a large 1.12 acre lot, with what are described as pristine desert views from every window of the house.

If the move to Arizona is for you, the asking price is $595,000 — via WowHaus

Design
Balthazar / MB&F + L'Epée 1839

Balthazar / MB&F + L’Epée 1839

Meet Balthazar. He’s a slightly terrifying robot-shaped clock that has a smiling face on one side and a grimacing skull on the other. Balthazar is the latest collaboration between MB&F and L’Epée 1839, a traditional Swiss clock maker.

MB&F is calling Balthazar the big brother to Melchior, the robot clock it first launched at Baselworld 2015. The clocks have the same basic structure, each with discs for the time and the escapement in the dome on the robot’s head.

Balthazar is available with four different colors of armour – black, silver, blue, and green — each limited to 50 pieces. All colours will retail for CHF52,000 — via Hodinkee

Design
Ahm House / Jorn Utzon

Ahm House / Jorn Utzon

Ahm House in Harpenden, Hertfordshire was designed by Jorn Utzon and fellow Dane Povl Ahm back in 1962, with a sympathetic extension by Ulrick Plesner, an architect at Arup engineering firm. A further discreet extension was added as part of a detailed refurbishment by the 800 Group some years later.

Don’t worry too much about that, as it was done with an attention to detail and a quality of finish that only enhances this place. In fact, unless you look very closely, you will just presume that this place is an untouched piece of 1960s modernism. Which is a credit to everyone who has interacted at the house over the past 54 years.

It was up in 2007 for £2.5 million and like most places, prices have moved up and up since then. Right now this is on the market for £3.5 million — via WowHaus

Design
Time Hunter X-Ray / Urwerk

Time Hunter X-Ray / Urwerk

Urwerk’s latest creation is the Time Hunter X-Ray, a skeletonised watch that tracks its own performance. It’s powered by the EMC movement, a mechanical movement has an electronic module powered by a tiny crank that allows the wearer to measure the balance rate and amplitude on demand. No doubt it’s strange, but it’s also charming in a deeply nerdy way — via Hodinkee

Design
Shiny Harry / Berham Customs

Shiny Harry / Berham Customs

For once, roadworthiness doesn’t matter. Built by the Berlin-based workshop Berham Customs, this skeletal machine whipped the ass of several factory-backed entries at the Glemseck 101 festival a few days ago, taking home the coveted Sprint International trophy. Just sixteen builders were invited to race in Glemseck’s famous Poets Of Sprint series. When Berham main man Martien Delfgaauw got the prized invitation, he knew exactly where to start the build: With a genuine 1984 Harris frame owned by his partner Felix Pilz — via Bike EXIF

Design
Three Martini Lunch / Icon 1000

Three Martini Lunch / Icon 1000

When the guys at ICON 1000 aren’t designing gear, they’re working on bikes. The customs that roll out of the Slabtown headquarters mix retro cues with future tech—a twisted cocktail that strangely works. This Triumph Thruxton is the latest build from the Portland, Oregon crew, led by design director Kurt Walter. And it has one of the best names ever given to a custom: Three Martini Lunch — via Bike EXIF

Design
Cooke House / Frank Lloyd Wright

Cooke House / Frank Lloyd Wright

One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s final designs has just gone on the market in Virginia Beach. Known as the Cooke House, the 3,000-square-foot home was the result of a letter written by Maude and Andrew Cooke in 1951 that began thusly: Dear Mr. Wright, Will you please help us get the beautiful house we have dreamed of for so long?

Over a period of several years, the couple and Wright corresponded by letter, with an initial rendering appearing in 1953 and the final plans delivered in 1957. Construction didn’t begin until 1959, just two weeks before Wright’s death. The Cookes and their children moved in in October of 1960, their nearly-decade long dream finally becoming a reality, and lived there for the next 23 years.

When Daniel and Jane Duhl purchased the home in 1983, they immediately began a significant restoration project, for which they received an award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The four-bedroom is now considered a green, passive solar home and features two central air conditioning systems and a swim spa. It’s on the market for $2,750,000 — via Curbed

Design
Ibiza Campo House / Standard Studio + Ibiza Interiors

Ibiza Campo House / Standard Studio + Ibiza Interiors

The milky white façade of this house on the Spanish island of Ibiza belies a more colourful, textured interior, as well as a long history.  Built as a stable two centuries ago, the 484-square-foot structure had deteriorated tremendously over the years before Dutch practice Standard Studio and local firm Ibiza Interiors teamed up to revamp the place into a showroom and guest house.

Preserving what could be preserved — notably the original stone walls and sabina beams — the designers then added in a modern steel and marble kitchen, works by local artists, and various furnishings from dutch shop Modern Vintage. And with solar panels and water now sourced from a private well, the cottage can operate fully off the grid as well — via Curbed

Design
Rooiels Beach House / Elphick Proome Architects

Rooiels Beach House / Elphick Proome Architects

This beach house couldn’t get any closer to the water even if it wanted to. Located near Cape Town, South Africa, this house was designed to create an extraordinary living experience. The house was designed by Elphick Proome Architects, as a response to their client’s brief to create a single space vacation house and fully embrace the remarkable seaside location — via CONTEMPORIST

Design

Epic SF 24 / Jacob & Co

Despite its remarkably innovative design, the SF 24 — the only dual time zone watch of its kind — is eminently wearable at 45mm overall, and houses a movement created exclusively for Jacob & Co — the mechanical self-winding Concepto based Calibre 2220, with the exclusive GMT-SF24 module developed by Studio7h38. The self-winding movement has a 40 hour power reserve, and the SF 24 is offered in white gold, rose gold, or high-tech Grade 5 titanium.

With the SF 24, Jacob & Co continues its proud tradition of creating multi-time zone timepieces for the world’s most demanding — and discerning — travellers — via Youtube

Design
Wategos Residence / Zaher Architects

Wategos Residence / Zaher Architects

The design of this house is based around the home owner’s request to have a two floor modern concrete house that could function as two separate living spaces for both the clients and their kids. Designed by Zaher Architects and located in Byron Bay, Australia, the home is S shaped in its layout and sits directly on the beach front. To withstand the harsh marine environment, the home has been built using concrete, stone and hardwood throughout the house inside and out — via CONTEMPORIST

Design
Clach Mhor / Roddy Langmuir

Clach Mhor / Roddy Langmuir

The location is the Cairngorms National Park in Aviemore, Invernessshire, Scotland, with this early 1990s build the the work of Roddy Langmuir, designed for his father mountaineer Eric Langmuir. A design of some merit too, receiving a Royal Institute of British Architects award in 1996.

If this is your dream home or getaway (Inverness airport is around 40 miles away from the house), the asking price is offers over £550,000 — via WowHaus

Craft
Create a Faux Neon Sign with EL Wire / Jenny Ching

Create a Faux Neon Sign with EL Wire / Jenny Ching

Neon signs give an awesome glow, but actually making one would be a tricky, advanced DIY project.

For an easier, more accessible alternative, you can try neon’s modern cousin: EL wire. It’s low-voltage, easy to bend, and it’s driven by inexpensive inverters that can do tricks like flashing or fading. In short, it’s perfect for making your own faux neon sign — via Make:

Design
Devon House / Dirk Lohan

Devon House / Dirk Lohan

Described by the agent as the best example of international design in West Michigan, this is a bold, angular construction with beams aplenty, as well as a good amount of glazing across all floors. The architect, Dirk Lohan, is the grandson of Mies Van Der Rohe and judging by this particular construction, he’s certainly taken inspiration from his esteemed grandparent.

It’s a design that has aged well too. The house actually dates from 1991 making it around 25 years old, But it really could be from any era. A timeless piece of architecture, which tends to be a sign of quality.

This place was last up for sale back in 2013, selling for $600,000. Presumably work has been done to it since, as the asking price has risen to$1,200,000 — via WowHaus

Design
Gorilla Watch / Octavio Garcia

Gorilla Watch / Octavio Garcia

Octavio Garcia’s Gorilla Watch is a design-first, automotive-inspired creation. What’s being delivered here is a carbon fibre case with an anodized aluminium mid-piece (in racing red), a ceramic bezel, a shaped sapphire crystal with anti-reflective coatings on front and back, and a black leather rally-style strap with red stitching. Functions are hours, minutes, and centre seconds, and that’s it. The hour hand is a three-spoked affair styled like a steering wheel (the white section shows you the hour, while the black are merely decorative). If corners have been cut anywhere, you could say they’ve been cut in the movement, which is a Miyota 8125. The caseback is titanium, held in place by four screws that run straight through the bezel — via Hodinkee

Wildlife

Rhinos and Goats have a Unique Friendship / Working With Rhinos

Goats jumping around on rhinos at the Care for Wild Rhino Sanctuary.

Care for Wild Africa is a non-profit organisation (NPO) and the largest rhino orphanage in the world. It is determined to rescue, care, and rehabilitate wildlife that has been injured and/or orphaned. Working with Rhinos is an official agent of the Care for Wild Africa Rhino Sanctuary — via Youtube

Design
St John's Ambulance, Rye / Marta Nowicka & Co

St John’s Ambulance, Rye / Marta Nowicka & Co

Architects the world over seem to find ways of turning even the oddest building types—from sewer pipes to grain silos and many, many things in between—into sleek modern homes. London interior architecture firm Marta Nowicka & Co follows suit, converting this former red brick, circa-1950s ambulance station in the English town of Rye (about 63 miles south of the English capital) into a family’s four-bedroom vacation home.

Called St John’s Rye, the ambulance station, according to Dezeen, sits in a walled compound beside a Georgian-style dwelling that has been bestowed a Grade II historic designation in the UK. The original station itself has a double-gabled roof, under which designers at Marta Nowicka carved out an open-plan common area (including a kitchen, and living and dining rooms) and added a level to make way for bedrooms — via Curbed

Design
James B Christie House / Frank Lloyd Wright

James B Christie House / Frank Lloyd Wright

Rare opportunity in northern New Jersey: The oldest and largest of four Frank Lloyd Wright designs in the Garden State has come on the open market for the first time in decades. Sitting on seven acres of secluded woodlands, the 1940 James B Christie House embodies Wright’s Usonian concept, which called for simple, single-story dwellings that embrace natural materials and a strong visual connection to the outdoors.

The expansive horizontal structure, built from cypress wood, brick, and glass, features an L-shape plan common to Wright’s Usonian houses. Here, the living and dining areas sit perpendicular to a wing of bedrooms, and the kitchen takes up the intersecting corner. Glass walls, clerestory windows, and original built-in seating, tables, and chairs can be found throughout the home.

Already quite large at the original 2,000 square feet—here’s Wright’s Tarantino Studio to add a master bedroom suite that had been part of the original plans but was not constructed initially. The sunken space includes a bright sitting area—complete with its own huge brick fireplace and built-ins—that separates the bedroom from the bath. Now it’s on the market seeking $2,200,000, with a new heating system and roof in place — via Curbed

Technology
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NIST’s new password rules – what you need to know

It’s no secret. We’re really bad at passwords. Nevertheless, they aren’t going away any time soon.

With so many websites and online applications requiring us to create accounts and think up passwords in a hurry, it’s no wonder so many of us struggle to follow the advice of so-called password security experts.

At the same time, the computing power available for password cracking just gets bigger and bigger.

OK, so I started with the bad news, but this cloud does have a silver lining.

It doesn’t need to be as hard as we make it and the government is here to help.

That’s right, the United States National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) is formulating new guidelines for password policies to be used in the whole of the US government (the public sector).

Why is this important? Because the policies are sensible and a great template for all of us to use within our own organisations and application development programs.

Anyone interested in the draft specification for Special Publication 800-63-3: Digital Authentication Guidelines can review it as it evolves over on Github or in a more accessible form on NIST’s website.

For a more human approach, security researcher Jim Fenton did a presentation earlier this month at the PasswordsCon event in Las Vegas that sums up the changes nicely — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Design
Siskin House / Thornton Abell

Siskin House / Thornton Abell

Designed by Case Study architect Thornton Abell, the 1965 Siskin House in LA’s posh Brentwood neighbourhood is an International-style beauty distinguished by glass-and-steel pavilion-like living spaces and private, meandering gardens. It’s also been owned by bigwig Hollywood producer Jerry Bruckheimer since 1985.

Bruckheimer, who purchased the home for about $1.9 million, has listed the seven-bedroom, 9,030-square-foot house for just shy of $13 million. It comes with a full gym, pool, four fireplaces and ponds — via Curbed