Design

Sol Friedman House / Frank Lloyd Wright

An intriguing, saucer-like Frank Lloyd Wright home has come on the market in the Usonia community in Pleasantville, New York. Built in 1948, the Sol Friedman House, or Toyhill, as it was nicknamed, boasts a unique floorplan of two intersecting circles topped by mushroom-like roofs, whose motif continues in the mushroom-shaped carport nearby. The property at 11 Orchard Brook Drive, just 50 minutes north of New York City, is offered at $1.5 million — via Curbed

Art

Rat / Safely Endangered

Rat owners will tell you their creature of choice is actually smart and very clean, but if you’ve had a rat infestation, then you know how unpleasant it is to have them in your home. This comic by Safely Endangered will remind you why rats are simply jerks even when they’re pretending to be nice — via Neatorama

Entertainment

Obituary: Malcolm Young

Legendary Australian guitarist and AC/DC co-founder Malcolm Young has died aged 64.

Known for the powerhouse riffs and rhythm guitar that propelled the Sydney group to superstardom, Young’s family said in a statement he had been suffering from dementia for several years.

He was replaced by nephew Stevie for the band’s last tour promoting the 2014 album Rock Or Bust.

Young started AC/DC in 1973 with his younger brother, fellow guitarist Angus.

Their other brother George Young, a member of The Easybeats and a producer for AC/DC, died in October aged 70.

While Angus Young, the group’s school-uniform-wearing lead guitarist, was the public face of the band, Malcolm Young was its key writer and leader, the member the rest of the band watched for on-stage changes and cut-offs.

AC/DC was consistent for over 40 years with a mix of driving hard rock, lusty lyrics and bluesy shuffles, selling over 200 million albums, surviving the loss of its first singer and creating one of the greatest rock records ever in Back in Black, the world’s second best-selling album behind Michael Jackson’s Thriller — via ABC News

Design

Villa Slow / Laura Alvarez Architecture

Laura Alvarez Architecture has designed Villa Slow, a holiday retreat in the North of Spain that replaced where a stone-ruin once sat. Based on a traditional construction called cabaña pasiega (peasant cabin), Villa Slow is a stone cottage with a contemporary twist. All of the materials used to build Villa Slow are reused from the old stone shed or come from the area of Cantabria — via CONTEMPORIST

Design

Tolstoy House / John Lautner

The John Lautner-designed Tolstoy House in Alta Loma, California dates back to 1962 and is made up of three detached structures connected by a steel cable roof system and topped by light-weight wood sheathing, with semi-circular windows throwing in even more wow factor. Bold and striking. If you fancy owning a Lautner, this one is up for $1,488,000 — via WowHaus

World

A precise, three-word address for every place on earth / Chris Sheldrick

With what3words, Chris Sheldrick and his team have divided the entire planet into three-meter squares and assigned each a unique, three-word identifier, like famous.splice.writers or blocks.evenly.breed, giving a precise address to the billions of people worldwide who don’t have one. In this quick talk about a big idea, Sheldrick explains the economic and political implications of giving everyone an accurate address — from building infrastructure to sending aid to disaster zones to delivering hot pizza — via TED

Design

Tapper House / Vladimir Cacala

This stunning 1960s Vladimir Cacala-designed build is found in the St Heliers area of Auckland, New Zealand and according to the agent is as original as the day it was built, but with a small proviso attached to the statement. Nothing to worry too much about. Only that the owner has carried out subtle and sympathetic renovations works both as a mid century modern time capsule as well as a modern-era family home — via WowHaus

Design

Vintage BR V1-92 Military / Bell & Ross

This year Bell & Ross took its inspirations to a new level with the release of the BR V1-92 Military, part of its renewed Vintage collection, now in its third generation. The watch itself cites no specific era or reference number for its inspiration, but it takes on design details from a variety of different time periods to create its distinguished look. Featuring characteristics from an array of styles from the 1930s through the 1950s, and of course also with many modern flairs, the watch appears to have remixed many fan-favourite features seen in vintage military watches and placed them in a straightforward, 38.5-mm satin-polished steel case. Powering the watch’s distinct hand configuration is the automatic Calibre BR-CAL. 302, which is based on the Sellita SW-200, and stores a 38-hour power reserve. It is priced at $1,990 — via WatchTime

Design

Lloyd’s Signal Station / Fox and Company Shipping Agents

Lloyd’s Signal Station on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall was built in 1872 by Fox and Company Shipping Agents as a communication hub for passing trading vessels using flags. Lloyds took it on in 1883, operating until 1969. That resulted in an opportunity for someone to take it on. As you can see, it was eventually taken on as a residential property, becoming one of the mainland’s most southerly homes. £695,000 is the guide price for this one — via WowHaus

Art

Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond / Red Wolf

Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Pink, Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Red, Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Orange, Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Yellow, Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Green and Geometric Pattern: Split Diamond: Blue originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Weird

Memory Chemicals (1979) / Scarfolk Council

Just as Scarfolk Council demanded control over cultural memories and the historical narrative taught in schools, it also wanted to control individuals’ memories.

To ensure a docile, compliant populace, Scarfolk promoted the idea of clumsy townsfolk forever stumbling into situations and seeing and hearing things they shouldn’t, and proposed that measures be taken so that citizens only retained information that reflected the official party line at any given time.

Building on the success of the Black Spot Card campaign, potent, neurotoxic chemicals (and, in some cases, a steel truncheon) were employed, according to one leaflet, to: cleanse unnecessary or redundant memories, so as to unclutter the mind.

The campaign and treatments were so effective that some people became inexplicably afraid not only to go outside but also to go into rooms in their own homes in case they saw or overheard something forbidden.

Those who could still manage to venture into rooms immediately forgot why they were there and, following a deluge of confused calls to the authorities, they had to be reminded that they had forgotten, and should now forget that they had remembered that they had forgotten — via Scarfolk Council

Wildlife

Two Litters of Endangered Tasmanian Devils Born / Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is pleased to announce the arrival of two healthy litters of Tasmanian Devil joeys. According to keepers, this is one of the most successful years to date for the Zoo’s Tasmanian Devil conservation breeding program.

The first litter of three joeys arrived on 19 March to mother Lana. Keepers were recently able to take a close look at each joey and confirm their sex (two males and one female). Another female, Pooki, birthed four joeys more recently on 19 June, which are yet to emerge from the pouch — via ZooBorns

Design

Collector’s Nook / mf+arquitetos

There’s something undeniably retro about this new home designed by Brazilian firm mf+arquitetos. Sure, the furniture is clearly vintage, but those rough stone accent walls feel straight up mid century, not to mention the undeniable preponderance of warm-hued wood.

The space is dominated by timber panelling for the ceiling, shelves, and perforated wooden screens that cast a chequered light over the interior and can pivot to open the living room up to the yard beyond.

But the home combines its old-school elements with more contemporary-feeling touches, too. Its entire back wall is made of windows which fully open onto a living wall covered with ferns, essentially extending the home into the outdoors — via Curbed

Design

Optical Illusion Tile Installation / Casa Ceramica Tile Company

Looking at this picture, it seems pretty obvious that something is seriously wrong with the floor… right? And yet, as we should all know by now, things aren’t always as they seem, no matter how hard our brains try to reconcile the fact that a flat surface can look so believably sunken on one side. It’s kind of hard to wrap your mind around the fact that the effect is achieved simply by warping the shape of the tiles as they’re applied to the floor. Casa Ceramica Tile Company created the illusion for the entrance to their own showroom in Manchester, UK — via Urbanist

Art

Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower / Red Wolf

Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower: Blue, Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower: Blue/Brown, Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower: Grey, Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower: Brown and Geometric Pattern: Stylised Flower: Brown/Yellow originally uploaded by Red Wolf