Wildlife

Cheetah cubs / Saint Louis Zoo

For the first time in Saint Louis Zoo history, a cheetah has given birth to eight cheetah cubs. The cubs, three males and five females, were born at the Saint Louis Zoo River’s Edge Cheetah Breeding Centre on 26 November, 2017. Mother and cubs are doing well and will remain in their private, indoor maternity den behind the scenes at River’s Edge for the next several months — via Youtube

Wildlife

Mountain Lion Orphans / Oakland Zoo

In cooperation with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and the Feline Conservation Centre, Oakland Zoo has taken in two orphaned Mountain Lion cubs. The cubs were found separately in Orange County, two weeks apart from each other. Due to their ages and geographic proximity to each other when rescued, Oakland Zoo veterinarians will conduct DNA testing to determine if they are, in fact, siblings — via ZooBorns

Wildlife

Malayan Tiger Cubs / Prague Zoo

Two Critically Endangered Malayan Tiger cubs at the Prague Zoo are beginning to show their personalities. The cubs — one male and one female — were born on 3 October and only recently came out of the den with their mother, Banya. The animal care team chose the name Bulan for the male and Wanita for the female — via ZooBorns

Science, Wildlife

If Australian animals don’t poison you or eat you, they’ll burn down your house

Already replete with sharks, crocodiles, snakes and poisonous jellyfish galore, Australia may also be home to arsonist birds that spread fire so they can feed on animals as they flee.

The belief that birds like the Whistling Kite, Black Kite and Brown Falcon spread grass fires goes back so far that it’s commemorated in indigenous ceremonial dances, according to Bob Gosford, a co-author of this paper in the Journal of Enthnobiology.

The paper posits that the behaviour isn’t accidental: Most accounts and traditions unequivocally indicate intentionality on the part of three raptor species and a handful provide evidence of cooperative fire-spreading by select individuals from within larger fire-foraging raptor assemblages, it notes.

And while the researchers’ main interest was to confirm and document those stories, Gosford told Vulture South the research is also important to understanding how fire spreads in Australia.

This may give us cause to re-examine fire history, and the conduct of fire in this country, Gosford said — via The Register

Wildlife

Meet the Dog Protecting Planes From Bird Strikes / Great Big Story

Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, cooler than a cucumber in a bowl of hot sauce, it’s Piper the Aviation Bird Dog, ready for duty. Alongside his handler Brian Edwards, the dynamic duo protects the planes at Cherry Capital Airport from bird strikes. Birds can pose a huge threat to flight safety, but when they see Piper on his way, geese, ducks and gulls flee the runways. It’s an important job, but not one without its share of fun — via Youtube

Wildlife

Two Litters of Endangered Tasmanian Devils Born / Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is pleased to announce the arrival of two healthy litters of Tasmanian Devil joeys. According to keepers, this is one of the most successful years to date for the Zoo’s Tasmanian Devil conservation breeding program.

The first litter of three joeys arrived on 19 March to mother Lana. Keepers were recently able to take a close look at each joey and confirm their sex (two males and one female). Another female, Pooki, birthed four joeys more recently on 19 June, which are yet to emerge from the pouch — via ZooBorns

Wildlife

Los Angeles Zoo Introduces Endangered Snow Leopard Cubs

Los Angeles Zoo has announced the birth of two endangered snow leopard cubs, a male and a female, born on 12 May and 13 May 2017. The siblings spent several months behind the scenes bonding with their mother and getting to know animal care staff. Now, at four months old, the cubs have gained enough strength and coordination to navigate their outdoor habitat and make their public debut — via Youtube

Wildlife

African Cheetah v Meerkats / Dolph C Volker

Kinji the Cheetah is something special. He honestly tries making friends with everyone… especially the animals that lives within his reach. Here he is at 8 months and 2 years old trying to get the meerkats to scratch him. He ends up purring to the delight of getting a grooming from these small creatures. He has no idea they want to kill him. Meerkats are territorial and do not like predators — via Youtube