Wildlife

Googly-eyed Stubby Squid / Nautilus Live

The team spotted this Stubby Squid off the coast of California at a depth of 900m. The stubby squid (Rossia pacifica) looks like a cross between an octopus and squid, but is more closely related to cuttlefish. This species spends life on the sea floor, activating a sticky mucus jacket and burrowing into the sediment to camouflage, leaving their eyes poking out to spot prey like shrimp and small fish. Rossia pacifica is found in the Northern Pacific from Japan to Southern California, most commonly seen up to 300m deep, but specimens have been collected at 1000m depth — via Youtube

Wildlife

Fishing Cat Kitten / Hellabrunn Zoo

Hellabrunn Zoo is thrilled to announce that, Luzi, its female Fishing Cat, gave birth to a kitten on 1 November. The cute offspring is spending more and more time outside the birthing den, giving visitors an opportunity to catch a glimpse of the new arrival as it explores its home — via ZooBorns

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Gathering of ducks / Red Wolf

Gathering of ducks, Aloe flower spike and Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Science, Wildlife

World’s first domesticated foxes / Verge Science

Verge Science met the very cute and very bizarre result of an almost 60-year-long experiment: they’re foxes that have been specially bred for their dog-like friendliness toward people. They do a little behaviour research of their own, and discover what scientists continue to learn from the world’s most famous experiment in domestication. The fox experiment continues under the supervision of Lyudmila Trut at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics. Her book How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog), co-authored by Lee Alan Dugatkin, details the history and science behind the experiment — via Youtube

Wildlife

Cheetahs Chase Balls Flung by Cheetahpult / Oregon Zoo

A custom-made contraption has catapulted the Oregon Zoo’s cheetahs toward a new level of fitness. Dubbed the cheetahpult, it’s an 2.4 metre wooden device that flings a ball far enough for a cheetah — the fastest land animal on earth — to chase. After more conventional ball launchers fell short, the cheetahpult was designed and built by staff members with the zoo’s speediest residents in mind — via Youtube

Wildlife

Baby Rhino / Chester Zoo

A one-week-old rhino calf born at Chester Zoo has ventured outside to play for the first time. The little youngster spent around an hour running around and rolling in sand before returning to mum’s side and heading off for a much-deserved nap — via Youtube

Wildlife

Strut / Red Wolf

Strut, Sniff the flowers, Taste the sunshine, Pink magnolia, Pink magnolia and Wading through the pigface originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Black swan / Red Wolf

Black swan, Watching ducks, Scaring ducks and Moody pond originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Bush dog litter / Chester Zoo

The biggest Bush Dog litter ever born at Chester Zoo has emerged from its den.

The six pups, born to mother Mana, age 7, and dad Franco, age 4, have made their public debuts after spending their first few weeks of life tucked away in their underground burrows — via Youtube

Wildlife

Coast banksia (Banksia integrifolia) / Red Wolf

Coast banksia (Banksia integrifolia and Coast banksia (Banksia integrifolia originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Cheetah Cubs / San Diego Zoo Safari Park

These 7-week-old Cheetahs were born 6 January at San Diego Zoo Global’s off-site Cheetah Breeding Centre to an inexperienced mum named Malana. In an effort to care for her cubs, Malana inadvertently caused minor injuries to them. After being with their mother for five weeks, the cubs were taken to the Animal Care Centre to be monitored for medical issues. Keepers will keep close watch over them, feeding them a special diet of soft carnivore food and formula, and weighing them to monitor their health. After they turn 12 weeks old and receive their three-month immunisation, they will be returned to their home at the Cheetah Breeding Centre — via Youtube

Wildlife

Akeno, the greater one horned rhino calf / Chester Zoo

Zookeepers have revealed the name of a rare baby rhino born last month.

Meet Akeno, the greater one horned rhino calf — only the second of his kind to ever be born at the zoo.

The name Akeno is of Asian origin, meaning beautiful sunrise. And since his birth, he’s definitely been giving his mum the run-around.

Greater one horned rhinos can weigh up to 2.4 tonnes but, despite their bulky size, they can run at speeds of up to 40 kph.

And although at just one-month-old Akeno has a lot of growing to do, keepers say he has bundles of energy and is proving a real handful for mum, Asha — via Youtube

Wildlife

Xena / Longleat

An abandoned Cheetah cub is being hand reared by her keeper at Longleat. The female cub has been nicknamed Xena, after the warrior princess, which also marks her battling qualities. Xena spent her first ten days being cared for by her mum, Wilma. However, keepers discovered the tiny cub was cold, weak and alone on 19 April. Despite numerous unsuccessful attempts to get mother and baby back together, the decision was taken by keepers to remove the cub and rear her by hand — via Youtube

Wildlife

Wolverine Kits / Cotswold Wildlife Park

Cotswold Wildlife Park is now home to three new Wolverine kits. After spending approximately nine weeks hidden away in their underground den, the triplets are beginning to venture out and explore their new woodland enclosure under the watchful eye of parents, Sarka and Sharapova — via Zoo Borns

Wildlife

Scottish Wildcats / Edinburgh Zoo

Two rare Scottish Wildcats, born at the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo, may help provide a lifeline for the iconic species.

The kittens will join a conservation breeding programme, which it is hoped will save the species from extinction in the wild through future reintroductions — via Zoo Borns

Wildlife

Red Wolf puppies / ZooTampa

ZooTampa at Lowry Park visitors may now be able to see a litter of new Red Wolf puppies, which are the most critically endangered Wolf species in the world. Born in late April, in a natural den dug by their mother, Yona, the pups are living much as they would in the wild — via Zoo Borns

Wildlife

All Mine / Red Wolf

All Mine and Whatcha doing? originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Yellow Rose + Camellia japonica / Red Wolf

Yellow Rose, Yellow Rose and Camellia japonica originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Rescued Little Penguins Return to the Wild / Taronga Zoo

On Tuesday, 17 April, Taronga Wildlife Hospital staff released five healthy Little Penguins into the ocean after nursing them back to health in Sydney, Australia. The birds arrived at Taronga from nearby beaches over the past two months. Injuries included dehydration, a fishing hook injury and a broken foot — via Youtube

Wildlife

Fennec Fox Trio / Capron Park Zoo

Capron Park Zoo, in Attleboro, MA, excitedly announced the birth of three Fennec Fox kits. Two females and one male were born on 7 March to five-year-old mum, Hannah, and two-year-old dad, Taz. According to Zoo staff, this the second litter for the parents — via ZooBorns

Wildlife

Cheetah Cubs / San Diego Zoo Safari Park

These 7-week-old Cheetahs were born 6 January at San Diego Zoo Global’s off-site Cheetah Breeding Centre to an inexperienced mum named Malana. In an effort to care for her cubs, Malana inadvertently caused minor injuries to them. After being with their mother for five weeks, the cubs were taken to the Animal Care Centre to be monitored for medical issues. Keepers will keep close watch over them, feeding them a special diet of soft carnivore food and formula, and weighing them to monitor their health. After they turn 12 weeks old and receive their three-month immunization, they will be returned to their home at the Cheetah Breeding Centre — via Youtube

Wildlife

Bushfire / Red Wolf

Bushfire, Bushfire, Bushfire, Bushfire beyond the playground, Bushfire, Bushfire and Bushfire at night originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Golden penda tree (Xanthostemon chrysanthus) / Red Wolf

Golden penda tree (Xanthostemon chrysanthus) and Golden penda tree (Xanthostemon chrysanthus) originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Frangipani + Oleander + Rose / Red Wolf

Frangipani (Plumeria), Nerium oleander and Bi colour rose originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Science, Wildlife

Why do animals have such different lifespans? / Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

For the microscopic lab worm C elegans, life equates to just a few short weeks on Earth. The bowhead whale, on the other hand, can live over two hundred years. Why are these lifespans so different? And what does it really mean to age anyway? Joao Pedro de Magalhaes explains why the pace of ageing varies greatly across animals.

Lesson by Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, animation by Sharon Colman — via Youtube

Design, Wildlife

HexHives / BEEcosystem

The chief feature of any BEEcosystem hive is that it gives a literal window into the bee colony it houses. The hexagon-shaped module is framed in cedar and fronted with a pane of glass. Side vents can be opened and closed to connect multiple modules or to keep the bees contained if you need to move the hive.

How do the bees get inside your house? The hive can be connected to a tube that runs to a small window unit—sort of like a miniature version of vent tube for a portable air conditioner. The window unit has the added benefit of providing bees with an ideal platform for take-off and landing. The tube has a safety mechanism that instantly snaps closed if it’s ever disconnected.

BEEcosystems start at $599 for a one-hex hive — via Curbed