History, Wildlife

Meet the cat that guards the Hagia Sophia

Gli is a cross-eyed adorable cat that has been living in Hagia Sophia for the past 15 years. The Hagia Sophia is more than 2,000 years old and is one of the most extraordinary structures ever built. It has been a temple, church, mosque and museum through its long history.

See the Hagia Sophia through the eyes of Gli, the cat who guides — via Youtube

Wildlife

Eastern Black Rhino / Lincoln Park Zoo

Lincoln Park Zoo is excited to welcome its latest arrival after 15 months of gestation. On 19 May, Kapuki, an eastern black rhinoceros, gave birth to an healthy male calf at Regenstein African Journey — via YouTube

Wildlife

African wild dog puppies exam / Living Desert Zoo and Gardens

The Living Desert Zoo and Gardens is excited to share that all six puppies, born 24 April 2019 are healthy and thriving. Today, May 24th, the animal care and veterinary teams performed a routine well-baby exam and learned there are five male puppies and one female puppy in the litter — via Youtube

Wildlife

Gazania + Viburnum / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

African Painted Dog 8 Week Check Up / Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami’s newest litter of endangered African painted dogs received their follow-up 8 week exam which included getting weighed, having blood drawn and receiving vaccinations for distemper. This was only the second time that the puppies have been separated from their mother to be examined and they all did very well — via Youtube

Wildlife

Jedi / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Mock orange + Frangipani / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Art, Wildlife

Mushrooms + Spider + Graffiti + Moth / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Bee on Aptenia cordifolia / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Bromeliad + Magnolia / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Rufous Net-casting Spider (Deinopis subrufa) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Googly-eyed Stubby Squid / Nautilus Live

The team spotted this Stubby Squid off the coast of California at a depth of 900m. The stubby squid (Rossia pacifica) looks like a cross between an octopus and squid, but is more closely related to cuttlefish. This species spends life on the sea floor, activating a sticky mucus jacket and burrowing into the sediment to camouflage, leaving their eyes poking out to spot prey like shrimp and small fish. Rossia pacifica is found in the Northern Pacific from Japan to Southern California, most commonly seen up to 300m deep, but specimens have been collected at 1000m depth — via Youtube

Wildlife

Pink Roses + Frangipani / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Fishing Cat Kitten / Hellabrunn Zoo

Hellabrunn Zoo is thrilled to announce that, Luzi, its female Fishing Cat, gave birth to a kitten on 1 November. The cute offspring is spending more and more time outside the birthing den, giving visitors an opportunity to catch a glimpse of the new arrival as it explores its home — via ZooBorns

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) / Red Wolf

— originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Wildlife

Gathering of ducks / Red Wolf

Gathering of ducks, Aloe flower spike and Orange flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Science, Wildlife

World’s first domesticated foxes / Verge Science

Verge Science met the very cute and very bizarre result of an almost 60-year-long experiment: they’re foxes that have been specially bred for their dog-like friendliness toward people. They do a little behaviour research of their own, and discover what scientists continue to learn from the world’s most famous experiment in domestication. The fox experiment continues under the supervision of Lyudmila Trut at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics. Her book How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog), co-authored by Lee Alan Dugatkin, details the history and science behind the experiment — via Youtube