Design

Stuart Richardson House / Frank Lloyd Wright


A new Frank Lloyd Wright home has come on the market, this time in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. Wright designed the Stuart Richardson House in 1941 for an actuary and his wife following his concept of Usonian architecture. Constructed ten years later under his guidance (and meticulously restored to purists’s standards in 2006), the 167 square-metre three-bedroom features a unique hexagonal floor plan that leaves all but two of the residence’s angles measuring either 60 or 120 degrees. In fact, large, deep red hexagon-shaped tiles make up all the floors in the home.

The brick house also boasts extensive cypress panelling and woodwork, most noticeably on the ceilings, where boards meet at chevron-like angles, drawing the eye toward various points of the house. Triangle skylights and patterned clerestory windows puncture the flat roof line, while floor-to-ceiling windows throughout usher the outdoors in. A pool and original built-in furniture and storage round out this unique property. Located at 63 Chestnut Hill Place, it’s asking $995,000 — via Curbed

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