Design

Undercroft / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

The skateboarder community and Long Live Southbank have worked in collaboration with the Southbank Centre and London-based architects Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, not just to maintain the space but to expand it to its original size. While Long Live Southbank had to entirely crowdfund the roughly $1.37-million project, the restoration was also made possible with the help of broad public support — via ArchDaily

Design

V2-92 Military Beige / Bell & Ross

There’s a certain balance to this watch that’s hard to come by; the models typically associated with Bell & Ross don’t quite exemplify the same sort of utilitarian design that the V2-92 gets right. It’s a total military mash-up, with design elements borrowed from field watches and dive watches packaged in a thin case. The domed crystal adds some additional thickness, for a total of 12mm thickness overall, but thanks to the thin case and high domed crystal you still get a very wearable watch. On a steel bracelet, $3,200; on an elastic canvas strap, $2,900 — via Hodinkee

Design

Superocean 44 Automatic Ironman Limited Edition / Breitling

The Breitling Superocean 44 Automatic Ironman Limited Edition is built and designed in the ocean pilot style of the Superocean 44 Special series, which combines classical aviation-watch DNA with traditional divers’ watch elements. The watch has a 44-mm stainless steel case and a ratcheted, unidirectional rotating bezel made of scratch-resistant ceramic. Also in black is the dial, which features the red-and-white Ironman logo prominently at 3 o’clock. The case is fitted with a twin-gasket screw-locked crown, which helps guarantee the watch’s water-resistance to an impressive 1,000-metre, depth. Priced at $3,950 — via WatchTime

Design

Fosson Residence / Christopher Rose

Nature meets luxury at this sprawling home in a private golf club development in Arden, North Carolina. Built in 2010 for an artist and financier, the four-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bathroom home balances whimsy with some practical amenities. The shingle-clad house opens onto an expansive great room with a dramatic timber vaulted ceiling and stone wall. An octagonal master suite comes with 5.5m vaulted ceilings and a wall of windows that look out onto the rolling green hills — via Curbed

Design

Grey Lea House / Adams Associates

Andrew and Helen Berry’s passion for Art Deco inspired them to try and recreate all the glamour of the 1930s in a 21st century home in Surrey. The problem was that they had firm ideas on what the outside would look like, but less of an idea of how to work the interior. But like most Grand Designs projects, it all came through in the end and what you see here is pretty much what was created 12 years ago. The current asking price, which is £1,600,000 — via WowHaus

Design

Weston Ridge Residence / Mickey Muennig

Situated along the winding coast of California’s Highway 1, this modern masterpiece is perfectly positioned to soak up the otherworldly views of Big Sur. Renowned architect Mickey Muennig designed the five-bedroom house in the mid-1970s, and it’s recently undergone a $1.5 million restoration and expansion to bring Muennig’s vision into the present — via Curbed

Design

Meyer House / Charles Eames + Robert Walsh

Charles Eames is best known for the moulded plywood chairs that became a mainstay of mid century modern design. But one of his earliest projects was this six bedroom, six bath home in Huntleigh, Missouri. Called the Meyer House after its original owners, the sprawling 675 square metre structure was designed by Eames in 1937 in partnership with Robert Walsh, and it’s now on the market for the first time in over 55 years — via Curbed

Design

William Thaxton House / Frank Lloyd Wright + Kirksey Architecture

There are only three homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Texas, and this six-bedroom, six-and-a-half property — called the William Thaxton house — is the only in Houston. Originally constructed in 1955 as a modest 167 square metre Usonian, the home was designed for a wealthy insurance executive. It now includes a renovation from 1995 designed by local architect Bob Inaba of Kirksey Architecture that added 585 square metres. The renovation used Wright’s L-shaped, single-story building as a centrepiece, adding an enclosed patio, central courtyard, and expanded family room — via Curbed

Design

Casa de Vidrio / Aaron Bohrer

This five-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bath home located north of the city overlooking the Santa Fe Opera is called Casa de Vidrio, or glass house. The property consists of two structures: A 520 square metre main house and a 148 square metre guest house. Both structures sit on two lots that total 13.5 acres accessed through 24-hour security at Casas de San Juan. The contemporary design was built with art collecting in mind, as much of the house boasts ideal spots to showcase paintings, sculptures, tapestries, ceramics, and glass — via Curbed

Design

Isla Lebe / Guillermo Acuña

When Guillermo Acuña decided to build himself a getaway on the remote Chilean archipelago of Chiloé, he did so with a perfect balance of rustic charm and modern touches.

Named Isla Lebe, the house is a series of three buildings, joined by raised wooden pathways that cut through the verdant landscape and protect the structures from high tides — via Curbed

Design

Regent No 1 / Regent

Perhaps you just like the old school look, but don’t feel comfortable with ageing mechanics. Or maybe you just like the idea of something environmentally-friendly. If that’s you, the 1960s-style Regent No. 1 electric motorcycle might be your perfect mode of transport — via Retro to Go

Design

Sondern-Adler House / Frank Lloyd Wright

Originally designed in 1939 as an 84 square metre home, the Sondern-Adler House in Kansas City, Missouri features three squares that form the classic Usonian L-shape. In 1948 the home’s second owners hired Frank Lloyd Wright to expand the property to its current 275 square metres, adding a great room, a third bedroom, a carport, and two additional bathrooms — via Curbed

Design

Pattaya Redemptorist School For the Blind / Creative Crews

At this school in Bangkok, Thailand, every surface is a learning experience. The Pattaya Redemptorist School For the Blind enrols students with varying levels of vision ability. Its goal is to help teach those students how to read and navigate the world around them.

The school enlisted Bangkok design studio Creative Crews to transform the building into a tactile experience where walls and floors become spaces for play and learning. Designed around the pre-braille curriculum, which helps young children develop tactile awareness and prepare for reading and writing braille, the school’s new additions include several perforated and magnetised walls onto which objects can be inserted and attached — via Curbed