Design

Scrambler / Vintage Electric


The Vintage Electric Scrambler is not designed to replace your Harley-Davidson Road King. It’s designed for short commutes, scooting over to a friend’s house on a sunny evening, or zooming down a twisty fire road.

The heart of the bike is a 702 watt-hour lithium battery, housed in a tough casing sand cast just up the road in San Jose, CA. It takes around two hours to recharge, at an estimated cost of 18 cents.

Boosted by a regenerative braking system, you get a range of 56km in the regular Street Mode, which has a top speed of 32 kph. That might seem slow—heck, it is slow—but it means that the Scrambler can be ridden on public roads in the USA and EU without a license.

At the flick of a switch, you can enter Race Mode, which engages a 3,000 watt rear hub motor and takes you up to 64 kph. But that’s only for when you’re on private property — via Bike EXIF

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