Craft, Entertainment

Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star / Frank Howarth

Frank Howarth has wood turned a Death Star out of bamboo plywood. The build consists of making two segmented halves that seam together at the trench. Each half is made of 9 rings. Each ring has 13 segments. There is one extra ring to help the two halves overlap at the seam. The superlaser dish was turned separately. The hole in the Death Star and the profile of the dish were cut on the CNC router to allow to two to fit together — via Youtube

Entertainment

ANA / Factory Fifteen

ANA from Factory Fifteen on Vimeo.

Factory Fifteen collaborated with Raw TV on the development of our original take on the singularity, the point where artificial intelligence becomes self aware and more intelligent than the human race. They created a seven minute proof of concept, teasing at a larger project currently in development. Their role developed along the course of the project from consultation and script development, to directing an ambitious live action shoot and finally delivering TV standard visual effects, all in house in the Factory Fifteen Studio.

The film shows one vignette within a bigger picture, highlighting an AI called ANA who deceives Jim, a redundant car factory worker, in giving her full control over the facility. ANA is imbedded into every major manufacturing industry in the world, including medical and food resources. Her seeming betrayal to mankind could be devastating. Only she knows her true intentions.

Craft, Entertainment

The Clockwork Orange Bedcover / Bart Gold

Being the attempt to recreate a one of a kind movie prop using fabric, gumption and couch foam. Can Bart recreate Alex DeLarge’s puffy, dimensional bedding, as seen in A Clockwork Orange?

This amazing prop was only on screen for a minute and 40 seconds, in two scenes. The actual screen-used Clockwork Orange bedspread is said to have degraded in storage, ultimately to be disposed of. Will we be able to recreate it?

And how crazy will the level of effort needed be? — via Youtube

Art, Entertainment
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix

Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix

— via owlturdcomix

Entertainment

The Mystery of the Maltese Falcon

A statuette from the John Huston-Humphrey Bogart classic The Maltese Falcon is one of the most recognisable, and sought-after, pieces of movie memorabilia in history. In fact, Steve Wynn paid $4.1 million for it. But was it the genuine article? Bryan Burrough tracks down a flock of Falcons, with links to both Leonardo DiCaprio and a famous Hollywood unsolved murder.

Aong with the ruby slippers Judy Garland wore in The Wizard of Oz and Orson Welles’s Rosebud sled, which burns in the final frames of Citizen Kane, there is probably no more iconic item of Hollywood memorabilia than the Maltese Falcon, the black statuette that Humphrey Bogart, as detective Sam Spade, tracked down in John Huston’s classic film of the same name.

Lost to history for decades, it resurfaced in the 1980s in the hands of a Beverly Hills oral surgeon, and beginning in 1991 traveled the world as part of a Warner Bros. retrospective, with stops at the Centre Pompidou, in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art, in New York, and elsewhere. In 2013 it was offered for sale by Bonhams auction house. There was talk it might go for $1 million or more. But at the auction in Bonhams’s Madison Avenue showroom on November 25, 2013, the bidding quickly passed $1 million, then $2 million, then $3 million. Spectators gasped as a bidder in the audience dueled with one on the telephone, driving the price higher and higher.

Only when the bidding reached $3.5 million did the bidder in the crowd surrender, sending the Falcon to the man on the phone, who was later revealed to represent Steve Wynn, the Las Vegas hotel and casino billionaire. With the buyer’s premium, the total price came to a stunning $4.1 million. The crowd burst into applause. The auctioneers wheeled out a tub of champagne bottles to celebrate.

And with good reason. It was one of the highest prices ever paid for a piece of movie memorabilia, and two of the others were for cars: the original Batmobile, which had sold for $4.6 million earlier that year, and the Aston Martin Sean Connery drives in Goldfinger. News of the Falcon sale was carried on the network news and in newspapers around the world. Today it sits, along with a pair of Picassos, a Matisse, and a Giacometti sculpture, in a meeting room in Wynn’s Las Vegas villa.

That is the official version of what happened to the Maltese Falcon. But it is just one chapter in a complex tale. It turns out there is another, far stranger version, and another Falcon, several more in fact. And this version, which draws in characters as diverse as Leonardo DiCaprio and the woman butchered in one of Hollywood’s greatest unsolved murders, constitutes a real-life mystery every bit as bizarre as the one Sam Spade confronted on film — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

Obituary: Alan Rickman

Actor Alan Rickman, known for films including Harry Potter, Die Hard and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, has died at the age of 69, his family has said.

The star had been suffering from cancer, a statement said.

He became one of Britain’s best-loved acting stars thanks to roles including Professor Snape in the Harry Potter films and Hans Gruber in Die Hard.

Harry Potter author JK Rowling led the tributes, describing him as a magnificent actor and a wonderful man.

She wrote on Twitter: There are no words to express how shocked and devastated I am to hear of Alan Rickman’s death.

She added: My thoughts are with [Rickman’s wife] Rima and the rest of Alan’s family. We have all lost a great talent. They have lost part of their hearts — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

Obituary: David Bowie

Rock legend David Bowie has died at the age of 69 after an 18-month-long battle with cancer, according to his son and to his official Facebook page.

David Bowie died peacefully today surrounded by his family after a courageous 18-month battle with cancer, the statement read.

While many of you will share in this loss, we ask that you respect the family’s privacy during their time of grief.

His son Duncan Jones tweeted: Very sorry and sad to say it’s true. I’ll be offline for a while. Love to all.

Born David Jones in London in 1947, Bowie enjoyed a string of worldwide hits from the late 1960s onwards.

Known for albums including Heroes, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, and Hunky Dory, he established himself as one of music’s most innovative performers.

On Saturday, Bowie marked his 69th birthday with the release of a new album, Blackstar, with critics giving the thumbs up to the latest work in a long and innovative career.

The album features only seven songs, but Britain’s Guardian newspaper called it a spellbinding break with Bowie’s past.

The singer, songwriter, actor and artist had returned to the music scene after 2013’s chart-topping The Next Day, itself released after a 10-year gap — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

Quentin Tarantino’s Visual References

It is a well known fact that Quentin Tarantino is a self-proclaimed cinephile. But the writer/director’s love for cinema is most obviously expressed through his own films. In addition to showing his characters spending a great deal of time discussing cinema, Tarantino’s films are jam-packed with homages and visual references to the movies that have intrigued him throughout his life.

Many filmmakers pay homage, but Tarantino takes things a step further by replicating exact moments from a variety of genres and smashing them together to create his own distinct vision. Just like Kill Bill: Vol 2 (2004) draws on The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) and Samurai Fiction (1998), Tarantino’s work often reflects Spaghetti Westerns and Japanese cinema — both new and old. His unique way of referencing other films allows him to bend genre boundaries and shatter the mold of what we expect to experience. While his methods are often criticised and he is accused of ripping off other filmmakers, it seems that Tarantino is simply writing love letters to the art he is ever so passionate about.

From German silent-cinema to American B movies, the following video uses split-screen to demonstrate a few of the hundreds of visual film references over the course of Tarantino’s career — via Vimeo

Entertainment

Obituary: Stevie Wright

Stevie Wright, who fronted rock outfit The Easybeats in the 1960s and is widely regarded as Australia’s first international pop star, has died at the age of 68.

The ARIA hall of famer became ill on Boxing Day and was taken to Moruya Hospital on the New South Wales south coast, where he died on Sunday night with his son Nick by his side.

Rock historian Glenn A Baker said Wright was a dynamo on stage.

Stevie would hurl himself off stage he would catapult, he would somersault, it was an extraordinary thing to witness, he gave everything, he said — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

She Bop / GWAR

GWAR scares us, both because they’re giant monsters from outer space with exaggerated genitals, and also because they keep coming back to Undercover and destroying (in the best way) every song they attempt. This year it’s Cyndi Lauper’s She Bop, the 1984 single that followed in the massive wake of Girls Just Want To Have Fun. The lyrics here are something of an extension of that song, considering that they’re about masturbation. Though they’re pretty tame-sounding 30 years later, the words to She Bop were cited as one of the filthy 15 that led to Tipper Gore and the PMRC getting all up in the music business. As usual, GWAR made the song their own — and added a little something extra, too — via Youtube

Art, Entertainment

Summer of ’76 limited edition print / Shag

Quite a departure from Josh Agle — aka Shag — who has left the 1960s and dropped into the ‘70s for this wonderful Summer of ’76 limited edition print.

Of course, the stars of this particular show are The Ramones and (we are guessing) the CBGB club. Although we’re not sure if there were so many posters on the wall of the club back in 1976! Either way, it’s an iconic band in a cool club setting.

It is a 13-colour hand pulled serigraph print, sized at 32.5 x 17 inches (82.5cm x 43cm) and sold in an edition of 150. Each print is also signed and numbered by Shag and comes with a certificate of authenticity. The initial price is $450 — via Retro To Go