Art, Entertainment
  • Death Wish / Owlturd Comix
  • Death Wish / Owlturd Comix
  • Death Wish / Owlturd Comix
  • Death Wish / Owlturd Comix

Death Wish / Owlturd Comix

image / twitter / facebook / patreon — via Owlturd Comix

Entertainment

Queen object to Trump’s use of ‘We are the Champions’

British rock band Queen are not happy with Donald Trump’s unauthorised use of one of their songs during his campaign to try to become the US President.

Their hit We Are The Champions was used to introduce Trump on stage to cheering crowds at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

In a statement, the band said: An unauthorised use at the Republican Convention against our wishes — Queen.

The song was played again when Trump’s wife Melania stepped on stage to give a speech, which was later mired in controversy over claims that parts of it were plagiarised from Michelle Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention in 2008 — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

Rod Serling on Kamikazes / Blank on Blank

The most unfettered imagination belongs to young people, and they don’t walk through life; they fly — Rod Serling in 1963.

If you’ve never seen the Twilight Zone, you’re missing what might be one of the smartest and most thought-provoking television series of all-time. On the surface, it mimicked ordinary life. The pace was ordinary until challenges to the deepest fears and uncertainties that lurk inside the mind took hold.

The series ran from 1959-64 and was created by Rod Serling. The show was mesmerising audiences across the US when he was interviewed for Australian radio by Binny Lum. We came across this conversation in Australia’s National Film and Sound Archive and it’s one of those delightful back and forths that makes you stop and listen. Serling jumps into the conversation, there’s little apprehension, and suddenly he takes you on a journey thinking about your own past and childhood, and the ultimate realisation that you simply cannot go home again — via Youtube

Art, Entertainment

3 colour screen print signed and numbered edition of 100, 18″ x 24″

Spoke Art presents an exclusive Kurt Russell double feature screening of The Thing and Bone Tomahawk at the Roxie Theatre in San Francisco, 28 May 2016. This print was made to commemorate the event — via Spoke Art

Art, Entertainment

SWANH.NET is an adaptation of Star Wars Episode IV in a style that was inspired by infographics. One story in one piece of 123 metres length — via swanh.net

Craft, Entertainment

Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star / Frank Howarth

Frank Howarth has wood turned a Death Star out of bamboo plywood. The build consists of making two segmented halves that seam together at the trench. Each half is made of 9 rings. Each ring has 13 segments. There is one extra ring to help the two halves overlap at the seam. The superlaser dish was turned separately. The hole in the Death Star and the profile of the dish were cut on the CNC router to allow to two to fit together — via Youtube

Entertainment

ANA / Factory Fifteen

ANA from Factory Fifteen on Vimeo.

Factory Fifteen collaborated with Raw TV on the development of our original take on the singularity, the point where artificial intelligence becomes self aware and more intelligent than the human race. They created a seven minute proof of concept, teasing at a larger project currently in development. Their role developed along the course of the project from consultation and script development, to directing an ambitious live action shoot and finally delivering TV standard visual effects, all in house in the Factory Fifteen Studio.

The film shows one vignette within a bigger picture, highlighting an AI called ANA who deceives Jim, a redundant car factory worker, in giving her full control over the facility. ANA is imbedded into every major manufacturing industry in the world, including medical and food resources. Her seeming betrayal to mankind could be devastating. Only she knows her true intentions.

Craft, Entertainment

The Clockwork Orange Bedcover / Bart Gold

Being the attempt to recreate a one of a kind movie prop using fabric, gumption and couch foam. Can Bart recreate Alex DeLarge’s puffy, dimensional bedding, as seen in A Clockwork Orange?

This amazing prop was only on screen for a minute and 40 seconds, in two scenes. The actual screen-used Clockwork Orange bedspread is said to have degraded in storage, ultimately to be disposed of. Will we be able to recreate it?

And how crazy will the level of effort needed be? — via Youtube

Art, Entertainment
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix
  • Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix

Cthulhu’s Playing Hardball / Owlturd Comix

— via owlturdcomix

Entertainment

The Mystery of the Maltese Falcon

A statuette from the John Huston-Humphrey Bogart classic The Maltese Falcon is one of the most recognisable, and sought-after, pieces of movie memorabilia in history. In fact, Steve Wynn paid $4.1 million for it. But was it the genuine article? Bryan Burrough tracks down a flock of Falcons, with links to both Leonardo DiCaprio and a famous Hollywood unsolved murder.

Aong with the ruby slippers Judy Garland wore in The Wizard of Oz and Orson Welles’s Rosebud sled, which burns in the final frames of Citizen Kane, there is probably no more iconic item of Hollywood memorabilia than the Maltese Falcon, the black statuette that Humphrey Bogart, as detective Sam Spade, tracked down in John Huston’s classic film of the same name.

Lost to history for decades, it resurfaced in the 1980s in the hands of a Beverly Hills oral surgeon, and beginning in 1991 traveled the world as part of a Warner Bros. retrospective, with stops at the Centre Pompidou, in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art, in New York, and elsewhere. In 2013 it was offered for sale by Bonhams auction house. There was talk it might go for $1 million or more. But at the auction in Bonhams’s Madison Avenue showroom on November 25, 2013, the bidding quickly passed $1 million, then $2 million, then $3 million. Spectators gasped as a bidder in the audience dueled with one on the telephone, driving the price higher and higher.

Only when the bidding reached $3.5 million did the bidder in the crowd surrender, sending the Falcon to the man on the phone, who was later revealed to represent Steve Wynn, the Las Vegas hotel and casino billionaire. With the buyer’s premium, the total price came to a stunning $4.1 million. The crowd burst into applause. The auctioneers wheeled out a tub of champagne bottles to celebrate.

And with good reason. It was one of the highest prices ever paid for a piece of movie memorabilia, and two of the others were for cars: the original Batmobile, which had sold for $4.6 million earlier that year, and the Aston Martin Sean Connery drives in Goldfinger. News of the Falcon sale was carried on the network news and in newspapers around the world. Today it sits, along with a pair of Picassos, a Matisse, and a Giacometti sculpture, in a meeting room in Wynn’s Las Vegas villa.

That is the official version of what happened to the Maltese Falcon. But it is just one chapter in a complex tale. It turns out there is another, far stranger version, and another Falcon, several more in fact. And this version, which draws in characters as diverse as Leonardo DiCaprio and the woman butchered in one of Hollywood’s greatest unsolved murders, constitutes a real-life mystery every bit as bizarre as the one Sam Spade confronted on film — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Entertainment

Joe Strummer scribbling the lyrics to Broadway for the 1980s Sandinista! album, while the rest of The Clash record the backing track, as photographed by Pennie Smith in New York’s Electric Ladyland Studio — via Wil Wheaton