Design

If looking good heads up your list of priorities when it comes to buying a record player, then this Ricatech wooden turntable is well worth investigating.

It looks amazing. Crafted from lacquered wood, the player shows off the natural graining, with the metal detailing very much the icing on the cake. But this isn’t just a pretty face.

It is also a three-speed, belt-drive turntable (33, 45 and 78rpm), with speakers able to unfold when needed, along with USB output for digitising to PC or Mac, an Audio Technica needle and two AC adaptors (UK and Europe). A carry handle for ease of moving too.

Classy and classic, you can get one for €169 — via Retro to Go

Design

Kengo Kimura, the master craftsman behind Heiwa MC has no shortage of orders, despite being in the midst of a shifting landscape. The 2002-model Kawasaki W650 is loaded with trademark Heiwa finishings, and dripping with Japanese style. And no one executes the slammed, thin-saddle vibe as well as Heiwa — via Bike EXIF

Design

Murphy House / Richard Murphy Architects

The Royal Institute of British Architects’ 2016 House of the Year is the Murphy House, by Richard Murphy Architects. Built as the architect’s personal residence in Edinburgh, the playful, truly whimsical home, with its eclectic façade and unique profile, is also modular and adaptive to different seasons of the year.

Built on a small plot of land, the home has a footprint measuring just 11 by six metres and a floorspace of 165 square metres spread over an impressive five stories that encompass three bedrooms, living room, kitchen, dining area, study, basement, garage, utility room, and a roof terrace.

The dramatic, sloping roof is outfitted with solar panels and can be opened up in warmer weather, creating an outdoor space inside the home. Described as one of the jury members as a “box of tricks,” the residence features plenty of other surprises including pulleys, shutters, sliding doors, bookshelves whose backs double as window coverings, a secret mail receptacle, hidden bathtub, and so much more, making it the ultimate fun house — via Curbed

Design

If you’re looking for a groovy cabin retreat, you’d be hard-pressed to find one more, shall we say, atmospheric than this unusual creation in Snohomish, Washington. Designed by architect David Turner in 1976, the three-bedroom home is located on a bluff 48 km north-east of Seattle, surrounded by valley and river views.

Sitting on a woodsy six-acre property, the 170-square-metre abode comprises two heavily glazed pyramids connected by a matching pyramid-esque atrium/greenhouse. Bring your imagination, your contractor and/or roll up your sleeves, the listing urges. Indeed, the place could use some updates, notably where the shingle siding and kitchen are concerned. But with a huge fireplace surrounded by snug seating and plenty of full-height windows to admire nature from inside, this hand crafted abode seems like a cool place to hunker down — via Curbed

Design

A well-preserved mid century perched above a gorgeous, glimmering lake? A thousand times yes! This incredible Oregon retreat by Oswego Lake’s North Shore was built in 1965 and features five bedrooms and four baths over 585 square metres and multiple levels, all of the glorious walls of windows, built-ins, and time-capsule-esque details, and, of course, the spectacular views.

Parquet floors, wood-panelling, carved doors, dramatic, sloped-and-beamed ceilings, period kitchen (enhanced with modern appliances, natch), Japanese-style light fixtures and screens, in-floor stone bath, and a mini, hearth-facing conversation pit are just a few of the delights that make this property sing. Not to mention the vast balcony, dock, and boat house. Imagine all of the outdoor and entertaining possibilities—and live them out, too, for a cool $4,998,000. It’s located at 15530 Diamond Head Road — via Curbed

Design

The lads from Portugal’s Ton-Up Garage are self-confessed petrol heads who love anything with an engine. That love shows through with their newest release, a low and lean Triumph Bonneville called HotRod. It’s our interpretation of the crazy years between the 30s and the 50s, the guys tell us. The golden era of hot-rodding — via Bike EXIF

Design

Gorgeously remodelled and updated, this covetable property in Orange, California’s Fairhills Eicher tract is on the market for the first time since its original sale in 1964. Designed by A Quincy Jones and Frederick Emmons, the four-bedroom boasts a rare floor plan that was featured in only eight models in the city and includes a two-car garage and car port.

Now fully remodelled, the 2,000-square-foot home has a newly painted blue-grey façade accented by a horizontal strip of green that sets the tone for the rest of the residence. An expansive great room characterized by a beamed ceiling, stone fireplace, and new flooring seamless connects, by way of a wall of windows, to a replastered pool and stone patio outside.

A sleek new kitchen with quartz counter tops and the latest appliances, completely redone bathrooms, and new skylights are just a few of the home’s upgrades. As for what was left untouched, the aggregate flooring in the entryway and security buzzer are truly original. Located at 1070 North Granada Drive, it’s asking just under a million at $985,000 — via Curbed

Design

Take your pick from various colours, each one inspired by the classic VW van and each Balvi Campervan Magazine Rack designed to hold your magazines. Perfect for adding a quirky touch to a room and perfect for fans of the van. Made of metal and available online at £19 — via Retro to Go

Design

This HB1 replica was built by American Rob Phillips — best known as the man behind Husky Restorations, based in upstate New York. These days, Rob focuses on Yamaha HL500 restomods, but he also likes a good challenge. So he’s spent the past two years reverse-engineering the HB1 from photos and diagrams. Bimotas are all about the frame, and this one was built for Rob by Framecrafters of Illinois. It’s a work of art, and as close as you could get to the original without having the real thing on a jig to measure from — via Bike EXIF

Design

The designer of these limbs is Scott Summit, a designer with 20 years old experience in the field. He used 3D printing technology to create one of a kind artificial limbs for each of the patients. Even more, he allows each patient to bring their own ideas on how they can customise the shape or the design of the prosthetics — via Design You Trust

Design

This sprawling Midcentury home in Indianapolis is, according to the listing, of impeccable provenance, though it doesn’t say more than that, leaving us to piece together what we can. Built in 1960 by Marion Cordill and recently updated for contemporary living, the five-bedroom, nearly 10,000 square feet property is arranged into a unique V-shape, offering vast open-plan spaces and a flow that establishes a connection with the surrounding woods.

The main entrance and foyer, located at the central point of the house, features stained glass detailing and rich wood paneling that extends to a living area with a massive hearth and a wall of windows overlooking greenery. From there, one wing leads to a brightly lit dining room and modern kitchen, while one the other side, a vast and vaulted entertaining room with an extensive wet bar and views toward the woods is found.

Other amenities include built-in furniture, shelving, and storage, seven bathrooms, a finished basement with fireplace, hardwood floors, and an office. Located at 215 Williams Drive, it’s asking $1,380,000 — via Curbed

Design

This custom from K-Speed is called Diablo and it has no fenders, a dubious seat and trials tires—but it’s just so damn cool. And no, it’s not another BMW; it’s an early-80s 750cc Ural boxer knockoff — via Bike EXIF

Design

Casa GS in rural central Argentina was designed by Córdoba-based MWS Arquitectura as a country retreat for a family that currently lives in the city, the 8,000-square-foot residence spreads out over a single story in an L-shape on nearly two and a half acres of land bordered by a sunken gorge with a hidden river. The architects conceived of the minimalist structure as a timeless house, not only as a way to ensure that it endures, but also so that it would not impinge upon the site’s natural landscape.

Built with steel, wood, stone, and of course, concrete, the rectilinear four-bedroom property separates the common spaces from the private quarters in two wings. In addition to a formal living room with a wall of windows that look out onto the terrain, the home features partially enclosed stonewalled patios that are meant to function as outdoor living areas. Broad concrete beams link the different zones, creating a series of courtyards and gardens that connect the home with its site near the Sierras Chicas mountain range — via Curbed

Design

Panerai and the explorer Mike Horn are renewing their partnership with the Pole2Pole project.  On the explorer’s wrist is the new special edition Luminor Submersible 1950 3 Days GMT Automatic, in a 47mm titanium case — via Perpétuelle

Design

Architecture and interior design firm Powerhouse Company, have designed this home for a family with two children in the eastern Dutch city of Enschede, close to the German border.The two-floor home has an exterior of dark bricks, which is broken up by the use of large windows — via CONTEMPORIST

Design

Brad Monk is a racer. Sure, he has a day job, but come Sunday, he’s a racer — and this is his race bike. Trying to figure out what it is? We can help: it’s a Yamando; part Yamaha XS650, part Norton Commando. Or, as Brad puts it, the best of both worlds — via Bike EXIF

Design

Crate digging is fun, but not when you’re in the middle of a passionate DJ set. Chicago-based Flipbin solves this problem with a handy aluminium display-and-storage unit designed to keep 33 of your favorite 12-inch records on deck and within easy reach. Each Model 33 is powder-coated for extra strength and made in Illinois — via Cool Hunting

Design

Even when new, the 1970’s Kawasaki KZ400 was about as exciting as a baked potato. But Bujar and Gaz of Auto Fabrica have the magic touch, and they’ve just finished working their magic on the humble parallel twin — via Bike EXIF

Design

According to the agent, Chateau Nous in Ascot, Queensland is a listed villa, built for dentist Dr George Stewart and his wife Eileen in 1938 and is the work of architect DFW Roberts.

Initially the house was built with servants’ quarters and an electric dumb waiter to move food quickly to the upstairs breakfast room. Further down the line, a billiard room and a concrete air-raid shelter were added, with a secret tunnel located from the air-raid shelter to the original garage that runs underneath the house.

Moving further down the line, new owners in 1986 added a tennis court and swimming pool, plus a new master bedroom and ensuite and considerable remodelling of the kitchen and family room. But bear in mind this place has only has three owners, with the last of those also adding their mark in 2004 with further work. If you want to be just the fourth owner of this place, $5,750,000 is the asking price — via WowHaus

Design

Susana Herrera + FACTORIA designed the Yepun Astronomical Observatory in Lago Lanalhue, Chile — via ArchDaily

Design

It takes a very, very brave builder to tackle an MV Agusta. The slogan of the Varese company is Motorcycle Art, and for once, the advertising is true.

But Winston Yeh didn’t baulk when he got a call from MV Agusta’s people in Taiwan. A gleaming new Brutale 800 RR was soon delivered to his workshop in Taipei, ready for a unique Rough Crafts makeover — via Bike EXIF

Design

This largely untouched hexagonal home in San Diego’s affluent beach side community of La Jolla boasts an open plan, multiple levels, view-framing windows, and an abundance of unique architectural details. Built in 1964 as a personal residence by architect Loch Crane, an apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright and his Taliesin fellowship program, the 3,134-square-foot three-bedroom also features Japanese influences, which can be seen in the wood panelling and the clean lines throughout.

Mezzanines, porches, and gangways create vistas inside and outside the property, while plenty of built-in furniture like seating, shelves, and storage allow for even more efficient use of the geometric space. Though the house could use a little touching up — especially the carpeted floors — the tiled kitchen with gorgeous cabinetry, as well as the period-specific bathrooms should be retained as much as possible in order to maintain the time capsule’s authenticity. Located at 5950 Avenida Chamnez, it’s asking $3,200,000 — via Curbed

Design

Unseen above the restored cast-iron façade of this 1857 residential structure in Tribeca, a stunning modern loft extends the building’s liveable space, its form responding directly to lines of sight. Designed by WORKac and known as the Stealth Building, the addition had to work with the existing façade — to preserve its appearance, rendering it invisible became the obvious approach — via Urbanist

Design

The Pantah is one of those bikes from the 1980s that looks a little awkward today. But let’s not be too unkind: It set the template for modern Ducatis, with a trellis frame, belt-driven cams and a desmo valve system. From an engineering perspective, you could say that Fabio Taglioni’s swansong was also his finest hour. So we’re always pleased to see a custom builder do justice to the famous engineer’s work. In this case, it’s Maria Motorcycles of Lisbon — via Bike EXIF

Design

Archimedia in collaboration with their client, designed this home that sits high above a rocky cove on Waiheke Island in New Zealand — via CONTEMPORIST

Design

A half-chopped Yamaha, a head full of crazy ideas and a friendly wager: those were the ingredients for Jorge Rodrigues’ first build. And the results are pretty tasty. He sourced a 1998 Yamaha XJR 1200 and turned it into the The BMW R nineT that Yamaha could have built — via Bike EXIF

Design

It’s hard to imagine the previous life of this minimalist home in Montreux, Switzerland. Designed in 1911 to house railroad workers building the line connecting Montreux and Rochers-de-Naye, the no-frills house was constructed with large stone blocks that were found while digging the railway.

It has now been transformed into a cool, sleek country residence by architect (and owner) Ralph Germann. The renovation involved fusing what was originally configured as three apartments linked by a central staircase into one unified space. Only the stairs and its walnut handrail and wrought iron balusters were maintained.

A spare living room and kitchen are situated on the the ground floor, where a garden also resides outside. The master bedroom has been placed at the center of the house, while the children’s rooms are at the top. Concrete partitions and walls and wood floors and built-ins establish a sleek but warm atmosphere, where spaces are open and doors are used sparingly. Instead, sliding doors conceal themselves within the walls and wooden screens are employed to create separate zones. Wood burning stoves heat the property, which is set into a sloping hillside that offers stunning views of the Alps and Lake Geneva — via Curbed

Design

Once part of the popular dude ranch North Fork Ranch in Shawnee (just an hour out of Denver), this exemplar of southwest Colorado stone architecture known as Stonehenge was built by hand in 1931 and is now up for sale. Rustic, cosy, and full of character, the 3,208-square-foot three-bedroom features, three bathrooms, three wood-burning fireplaces, multiple sitting rooms, beamed ceilings, and plenty of vantage points — think private porches—to take in the gorgeous sights of the South Platte River.

The 40-acre property is nestled right into the hillside, offering privacy, access to hiking trails, and spectacular views of the 14,000-foot snow-capped mountains of the Continental Divide as well as of the surrounding Pike National Forest. A soul-restoring retreat, no doubt, it’s asking $1,400,000 — via Curbed

Design

This 19th century Thorn Island fortress near Pembroke, Pembrokeshire is an amazing space, as well as a grade II listed building, which obviously limits the scope of change.

Thorn Island dates back to between 1852 and 1854, when it was constructed from local stone as an outer defence to Milford Haven, which was then a large naval base.

If you like the idea of your own kingdom, Knight Frank has this up at £550,000 — via WowHaus

Design

Sydney Drain and Manhole Covers / Red Wolf

Pitt Street Mall Drain, Malco Metropolitan Water Sewerage and Drainage Board Hydrant Cover, Ska Optus Manhole Cover, DMR Manhole Cover and Traffic Signals Manhole Cover originally uploaded by Red Wolf

Design

The Galeries / Red Wolf

The Galeries, Glass Elevator, 201 Elizabeth Street, Mark Foy’s Building and North Apartments originally uploaded by Red Wolf

via Wikipedia:

The Foy brothers opened The Piazza in 1909 on Liverpool Street. This was a three-storey store (two floors plus basement) designed by architects Arthur McCredie & Arthur Anderson with a turreted mansard roof. The building partially modelled on the Parisian Bon Marche department store. premises in 1909; and its piazza, chandeliers, marble and sumptuous ballroom made it a Sydney institution and one of Australia’s foremost fashion stores. The store had Australia’s first escalator. The store stretched around a whole city block and gave rise to the colloquial saying, when referring to a person of overweening confidence, You’ve got more front than Mark Foy’s. The store was remodelled in 1927. The store was linked in 1926 to the newly opened Museum Railway Station by underground subway.

The City Piazza building is now used as a complex of state courthouses known as the Downing Centre. However, its former role is preserved in the ornate tilework on the facade and surroundings.

via Wikipedia:

The North Apartments, located at 91 Goulburn Street, Sydney, Australia, were designed by the late architect Harry Seidler.

Constructed between 2003-04, the building is oriented with a single façade to the North, facing Goulburn Street.

Each of the 49 apartments features a wave-shaped balcony, so as to accommodate outdoor furniture, at its widened part. The balconies are arranged in a vertically staggered pattern so as to maximise the spatial feeling. As a result, the design breaks away from the usual box-like structures associated with ‘infill’ development.

Colour is introduced into the façade by the use of integrally permanent coloured toughened glass on the balconies’ end rails and dividing screens. There are a mixture of primary and neutral coloured accents all over the façade, giving the building a lively appearance.

The apartments are designed following a split-level planning system, which results in a ceiling height of 2.85 m over the living area and 2.7 m in the raised bedrooms. These raised bedrooms have no windows, and open onto the lounge area. The building contains commercial space on the ground floor, and an indoor lap pool. The foyer of the building features a wall hanging of woven carpet, based on a wall mural in Rose Seidler House, painted by Seidler in 1950.

Design

Sydney Masonic Centre / Red Wolf

Sydney Masonic Centre, Sydney Masonic Centre Detail and Sydney Masonic Centre Stairs originally uploaded by Red Wolf

via: www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-013.htm

Joseland Gilling, 1974
Connell Mott MacDonald, 2004 (tower)

Corner of Castlereagh and Goulburn Streets, Sydney

Off form concrete facade
Civic Tower is Australia’s first building to be fully supported on a central lift core without the use of continuous perimeter columns extending down to footing levels. Constructed above Sydney’s Masonic Centre, the innovative structural design features a space frame using post tensioned tie elements and high strength concrete filled tubular steel struts to transfer the 25 story office building perimeter back onto its core.

Design

If you can’t yet afford the full-sized version, you can always for for the dream house in miniature, courtesy of the Mini City by McKean Studio.

This is a collection of miniature models featuring houses of Palm Springs. Midcentury modern houses of course, that’s what the area is famous for.

Each is made up of a variety of pieced (so you can tweak your house as you wish) and each of the handmade and hand painted models also comes with a piece of vintage mini transport outside too.

Check them all out on the McKean Studio website and if you want one, expect to pay AU$89 — via Retro to Go

Design

This former St John’s ambulance station in Sydney, Australia, has been transformed into an urban home with brick walls, vaulted ceilings and an open floor plan. This renovated ambulance station is currently listed for sale — via CONTEMPORIST