Rights, Technology

Error 451: The new HTTP code for censorship

Governments will not always be able to disguise which content they restrict across the Web thanks to a new error code which will warn users of content restricted through censorship.

On Friday, the group responsible for Internet standards, the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG), approved a new HTTP code to differentiate between Web pages which cannot be shown for technical reasons and others which are unavailable for non-technical reasons, such as governmental censorship.

Status codes, available within the 100s to 500s, are most commonly encountered when something goes wrong — such as a server downtime, for example, which prevents a user from accessing a Web page. The common 404 error tells users a page has not been found, but now 451 is coming into its own as a way to track other restrictions.

Online censorship is on the rise. Governments in the European bloc force ISPs to restrict access to websites linking to pirated content, China has its ever-famous “Great Firewall” which heavily restricts the Web, and countries including Russia and South Korea are also cracking down on access.

It isn’t always easy to work out whether a Web page is down because of technical reasons or governmental meddling. However, a new Internet protocol could change that.

Mark Nottingham, chair the IETF HTTP Working Group — developers of the Internet’s core HTTP protocol — explained in a blog post while the 403 error status code says “Forbidden,” it does not specify if there are legal reasons for restricting content.

However, status code 451 — a hat tip to Fahrenheit 451 — can now be used to distinguish pages unavailable due to censorship — via redwolf.newsvine.com

Share this Story
Load More Related Articles
Load More In Rights

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Photos from Flickr